Outside In: Walking and making a labyrinth

Welcome to the FrostArt ‘Outside In’ blog 

Thank you for joining in. If you have ideas that you would like to try let me know and they could be included.

It would be great to see what is made, so please take pictures of what you make and we can share them here.

For most of workshop activities you are likely to need some tools and materials. Collect them together and put them in a box or drawer will mean you know where they are each time. A box for indoor making and one for outdoors might be a good idea too if you have space.

I thought it would be fun to show you what I have been doing this week. 

I have been cutting a labyrinth on the green near our house. It is being used by lots of families for playtimes and exercise because they can’t use the playground
My reason for starting this was partly just for fun, because we all need some right now, and partly because I was aware of all the restrictions on children and families who are finding it hard to keep children busy and happy, so this is a way to support others locally. My family do not live near, we see them via internet, so Skype and Zoom have been really great for keeping in touch, chatting and regular story times but that is not at all the same as having hugs and playing together in homes, gardens or playgrounds.

 

I invited people to use it via the local Big Eye Spy face book page, families have been making use of it as part of their regular daily exercise and outdoor play. Some dogwalkers have been making use of it too, but I hear that the dogs cheat!
Walking the labyrinth is a great and safe way to meet up and share the experience with friends or family while doing some exercise, we all need reassurance and encouragement to be positive. I heard from one mum who is very grateful to have somewhere safe to take her children because they had begun to be afraid of going out of their garden. Mental health is more important than ever when times are uncertain and families need to find ways to share safe spaces and good experiences.
Some families have used the opportunity to learn about labyrinths in history or stories.
Do you know the difference between a labyrinth and a maze?
There is only one path in a labyrinth so you can’t get lost, in a maze there are lots of ways to lose your way.
Who was the Minotaur and where did he come from?
There is a labyrinth in the floor at the entrance of Ely Cathedral, the pathway is the same length as the height of the west tower.
What else can you find out about labyrinths, is there one near you?
There are lots of instructions available online for making labyrinths and mazes. These can be done using paper and pencil or on a larger scale, with Lego, stones or sticks to make the pathway.
The Labyrinth society has information about labyrinths all over the world, including visiting times to some and instructions about making one yourself.
You could make temporary pathways in different places each time you go out for a walk, they don’t have to be very long.
I am sure there are similar spaces in every community that could be used for simple and creative activities while families have limited access to play equipment. This was not a difficult thing to do and the space was available but not well used, especially with the children not going to school. Pathways indicate to others that friends or family can come and walk there too, so it is a good way to share the space even if not at the same time.
Cutting the grass in a pattern means cutting less, so uses less fuel and allows grasses and flowers to grow. This can be a really good way to encourage wildlife to thrive in the spaces as well.
Enjoy the journey!

 

Welcome to the FrostArt ‘Outside In’ blog

dreaming and making

Today is the start of a new blog. This is where I will be sharing ideas and plans to make things that are either just for fun, some will be useful and most will use materials you already have in the house or find outside. Life has changed, we can’t do or go to all the things we are familiar with because of the corona virus and we need to find different ways of living and working. For me all workshops, exhibitions and events have been cancelled or postponed for the foreseeable future. I also need to find ways of relating to family and spending time with grandchildren without being able to visit in person. Who knew we could make such good use of the technology we have all become familiar with?

As a family we often spend time making and doing together, so we plan to do ‘Ready, Steady, Make!’ each week.
I hope you will join me find things that can be adapted into something new, transforming rubbish into beautiful and maybe precious items.
Each post will have one outdoor and one indoor activity. I will give an indication of how long I think each might take to make but of course it will be up to you how long you spend on each.
 
For most of workshop activities you are likely to need some tools and materials. Collect them together and put them in a box or drawer will mean you know where they are each time. A box for indoor making and one for outdoors might be a good idea too if you have space.



For inside
An apron
Waterproof covering for table or floor
a tray or shoe box
an old basket or container for collecting things outside

Tools and materials
spoons – large and small
a trowel
a garden fork
an old blunt knife
pencils
crayons


For outside
A coat and hat, gloves or sunshade, depending on the weather
Outdoor shoes
A cushion or rug to sit on, if you are going to stay outside.
A board to lean on
A piece of paper, a camera or phone,
Pencils and crayons in a box or pencil case
A container ot collect things


It would be great to see what is made, please take pictures of what you make and we can share them.
If you have ideas and suggestions that you would like to try let me know and they could be included. We are all learning together, some of you might be able to translate the notes into other languages and share with friends abroad.


Thank you for joining in with this, I hope we get to do some good things together.
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Booking Commissioned Workshops

Commissioned workshops are designed in consultation with individuals, groups and communities. Jane has experience teaching groups with a wide range of ages and abilities, including family workshops, youth work as well as curriculum based training courses. Jane also works with other artists and practitioners including environmentalists, local historians, performers and storytellers. See examples of workshops and projects

Contact Jane@FrostArt.co.uk or call 07967 088 348 for more information

Gift tokens are available for special events, please contact me for details

Book group workshops or one to one sessions on dates and venues of your choice, please go here for more information. I have experience of leading workshops in a variety of settings both in UK and abroad with people of all ages and abilities.

For information about exhibitions and project work see my blog

WWT Welney Hides

Willow hides commissioned for the reserve at WWT Welney

Work in progress
New hides 2016
Work in progress
Willow hide
View from walkway
willow hide
View form the reserve

Work with Arts and Minds at Anglesey Abbey

Inside-Out, a large scale collaborative project with Arts and Minds and families at Anglesey Abbey which resulted in a sculpture trail in the extensive gardens and work being placed at all levels, including in the Mill Lode and high up in trees

Anglesey Abbey grounds
Planning the sculpture trail

willow and tissue flowers
Fantastic Flowers
willow creatures
Bugs
Surprise beasties
Holly Crocodile
Boiled egg in an urn
Giant Egg cup
willow and kite fabric insects
Butterflies in the tree tops
willow web
giant spiders web